bestbooks.biz
Welsh Legends
 
 
Home Biography Business Computing Fiction Food and Drink Gardening History Learning Psychology Travel
Home   Prehistory   History   American History   British History   Canadian History   Celtic/Welsh History  

The Mabinogion Tetralogy
by Evangeline Walton, Betty Ballentine (Introduction)
  The author of the classic Mabinogian, the great compendium of medieval Welsh mythology, is unknown to us, but generations have thrilled to the magical tales set at a time when men and gods mingled, and the gods had more than met their match, tales of the wizard-prince Gwydion, of Prince Pwyll and Lord Death, and of the beautiful Rhiannon and the steadfast Branwen. In the masterful hands of Evangeline Walton the twelve "branches" of the ancient text were reworked into four compelling narratives
  More information and prices from:
Amazon.com - US dollars
SeekBooks.com.au - Aus Dollars
Amazon.ca - Canadian dollars
Amazon.co.uk - British pounds
Amazon.de - Euros
Amazon.fr - Euros

Meddygon Myddfai

From British Goblins Welsh Folk-lore, Fairy Mythology, Legends and Traditions by Wirt Sikes (1881)

The legend relates that a farmer in the parish of Myddfai, Carmarthenshire, having bought some lambs in a neighbouring fair, led them to graze near Llyn y Fan Fach, on the Black Mountains. Whenever he visited these lambs three beautiful damsels appeared to him from the lake, on whose shores they often made excursions. Sometimes he pursued and tried to catch them, but always failed; the enchanting nymphs ran before him and on reaching the lake taunted him in these words:

Cras dy fara,
Anhawdd ein dala;

which, if one must render it literally, means:

Bake your bread,
'Twill be hard to catch us;

but which, more poetically treated, might signify

Mortall, who eatest baken bread,
Not for thee is the fairy's bed!

One day some moist bread from the lake came floating ashore. The farmer seized it, and devoured it with avidity. The following day, to his great delight, he was successful in his chase, and caught the nymphs on the shore. After talking a long time with them, he mustered up the courage to propose marriage to one of them. She consented to accept him on condition that he would distinguish her from her sisters the next day.

This was a new and great difficulty to the young farmer, for the damsels were so similar in form and features, that he could scarcely see any difference between them. He noted, however, a trifling singularity in the strapping of the chosen one's sandal, by which he recognised her on the following day. As good as her word, the gwraig immediately left the lake and went with him to his farm. Before she quitted the lake she summoned therefrom to attend her, seven cows, two oxen, and one bull. She stipulated that she should remain with the farmer only until such time as he should strike her thrice without cause.

For some years they dwelt peaceably together, and she bore him three sons, who were the celebrated Meddygon Myddfai. One day, when preparing for a fair in the neighbourhood) the farmer desired her to go to the held for his horse. She said she would, but being rather dilatory, he said to her humorously Dos, dos, dos,' i.e., 'Go, go, go,' and at the same time slightly tapped her arm three times with his glove.

The blows were slight - but they were blows. The terms of the marriage contract were broken, and the dame departed, summoning with her her seven cows, her two oxen, and the bull. The oxen were at that moment ploughing in the field, but they immediately obeyed her call and dragged the plough after them to the lake. The furrow, from the field in which they were ploughing to the margin of the lake, is still to be seen - in several parts of that country - at the present day. After her departure, the gwraig annwn once met her three sons in the valley now called Cwm Meddygon, and gave them a magic box containing remedies of wonderful power, through whose use they became celebrated.

Their names were Cadogan, Gruffydd and Emion, and the farmer's name was Rhiwallon. Rhiwallon and his sons, named as above, were physicians to Rhys Gryg, Lord of Dynevor, and son of the last native prince of Wales. They lived about 1230, and dying, left behind them a compendium of their medical practice.

The Tale of Elidurus is another typical story of an earthling joining the fairy people dating from the twelfth-century.

Antiquarian and Out-of-Print Books about Welsh Legends

British Goblins: Welsh Folk Lore, Fairy Mythology, Legends and Traditions

by Wirt Sikes
  1881. In a certain sense Wales may be spoken of as the cradle of fairy legend. It is not now disputed that from the Welsh were borrowed many of the first subjects of composition in the literature of all the cultivated peoples of Europe. In the ground it covers, while this volume deals especially with Wales, and still more especially with South Wales, where there appear to have been human dwellers long before North Wales was peopled, it also includes the border counties, notably Monmouthshire. Illustrated. Contents: The Realm of Fairy; The Spirit World; Quaint Old Customs; Bells, Wells, Stones and Wagons.
More information and prices from:
Amazon.co.uk - British pounds
Amazon.com - US dollars
SeekBooks.com.au - Aus Dollars
Amazon.ca - Canadian dollars
Amazon.de - Euros
Amazon.fr - Euros

Contact
Links
Privacy Policy
IslandGuide.biz
HRM Guide Australia
HRM Guide Canada
HRM Guide UK
HRM Guide USA
JobSkills.info
Copyright © 1997-2006 Alan Price and HRM Guide Network contributors. All rights reserved.